Planning is about how we plan for, and make decisions about, the future of our cities, towns and countryside. Over the centuries, a formal way of making these decisions was set up. Your local planning authority is responsible for deciding whether a development – anything from an extension on a house to a new shopping centre – should go ahead. Local planning authority usually means the district or borough council – not the parish or town council. The planning system is needed to control development in your area.

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WHAT IS BUILDING REGULATIONS?

Building Regulations are a set of requirements laid down by Parliament to ensure that building work is carried out to approved standards including:

The health, safety and welfare of people in and around buildings.

The conservation of fuel and energy within buildings.

Ease of access and facilities for disabled people in public and commercial buildings.

Fire safety and means of escape from buildings.

The Building Regulations cover a wide range of building work from major office, shop and residential developments to small domestic works like extensions, through lounges and loft conversions.

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DO I NEED PLANNING PERMISSIONS?

You can make certain types of minor changes to your house without needing to apply for planning permission. These are called “permitted development rights” and are described in this guide. They derive from a general planning permission granted not by the local authority but by Parliament. Bear in mind that the permitted development rights which apply to many common projects for houses do not apply to flats, maisonettes or other buildings. Incase of any doubt please write to your local authority and make an enquiry, these are best done with scaled drawings which can be provided by CK Architectural Services

The extension must be single storey and not exceed 4m in height

The house must not be on Article 1(5) land (eg Conservation Area, AONB, National Park, etc) nor on a site of special scientific interest (SSSI)

Before starting works, the developer must notify the LPA (by providing a written description, plan, etc)

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PERMITTED DEVELOPMENT

ERECTION OF PORCH

Adding a porch to any external door of your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided the following limits and conditions are met:

1

Ground area of the porch, measured externally, not to exceed three square metres.

2

Highest part of the porch not to exceed three metres.

3

No part of the porch to be within two metres of any boundary that fronts a highway.

DOUBLE STOREY REAR EXTENSIONS

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1

On designated land extensions of more than one storey are not permitted development.

* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2

Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. The term ‘original house’ means the house as it as first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so.

* Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit.

3

Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house. If extension is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.

4

Extensions of more than one storey must not extend beyond the rear wall of original house by more than three metres or be within seven metres of any boundary opposite the rear wall of the house.

5

Roof pitch of extensions higher than one storey to match that of the existing house, as far as is practicable.

6

Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house.

7

Any upper-floor window in a wall or roof slope in a side elevation must be obscure-glazed and nonopening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.

8

No balconies or verandas are permitted development.

SINGLE STOREY EXTENSIONS

An extension or addition to your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided certain limits and conditions are met.

1

On designated land cladding of any part of the exterior of a dwelling (and extensions) with stone, artificial stone, pebble dash, render, timber, plastic or tiles is not permitted evelopment.

* Designated land includes national parks and the Broads, Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty, conservation areas and World Heritage Sites.

2

 Extensions (including previous extensions) and other buildings must not exceed 50% of the total area of land around the original house. The term ‘original house’ means the house as it as first built or as it stood on 1 July 1948 (if it was built before that date). Although you may not have built an extension to the house, a previous owner may have done so.

* Sheds and other outbuildings must be included when calculating the above 50% limit.

3

Extensions forward of the principal elevation or side elevation of a house and fronting a highway are NOT permitted development.

4

On designated land side extensions are not permitted development.

5

Materials used in exterior work to be similar in appearance to those of the exterior of the existing house. This condition does not apply when the extension is a conservatory.

6

Width of side extension must not have a width greater than half the width of the original house.

7

Side extensions to be single storey with a maximum height of four metres.

8

If extension is within two metres of a boundary maximum eaves height should be no higher than three metres to be permitted development.

9

Single-storey rear extension must not extend beyond the rear of the original house by more than three metres if an attached house or by four metres if a detached house.

10

Single storey rear extension must not exceed a height of four metres.

11

Maximum eaves and ridge height of extension no higher than existing house.

LOFT CONVERSIONS AND ROOF EXTENSIONS

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A loft conversion for your house is considered to be permitted development, not requiring an application for planning permission, provided certain limits and conditions are met.

1

Roof extensions are NOT permitted development for houses on designated land*.

2

To be permitted development any additional roof space created must not exceed these volume allowances:

* 40 cubic metres for terraced houses.
* 50 cubic metres for detached and semi-detached houses.

Bear in mind that any previous roof space additions must be included within this volume allowance. Although you may not have created additional space a previous owner may have done so.

3

An extension beyond the plane of the existing roof slope of the principal elevation that fronts a highway is NOT permitted development.

4

Materials to be similar in appearance to the existing house.

5

No part of the extension to be higher than the highest part of the existing roof.

6

Verandas, balconies or raised platforms are NOT permitted development.

7

Any side-facing windows must be obscureglazed and non-opening unless the parts which can be opened are more than 1.7 metres above the floor of the room in which it is installed.

8

Roof extensions, apart from hip to gable ones, to be set back, as far as is practicable, at least 20cms from the eaves. The 20cm distance is measured along the roof plane.

9

Work on a loft or a roof may affect bats. You need to consider protected species when planning work of this type. A survey may be needed, and if bats are using the building, a licence may be required.

DO I NEED BUILDING REGULATIONS APPROVAL

The simple answer to this is yes for most building work you will need an approval from your local authority, failure to do so will result in enforcment action IE demand for works to be put right and even a fine for unlawful work. listed below are examples of works that are exempt from building regulations

Conservatories & Porches

For a Conservatory or porch (less than 30m2) to be EXEMPT under Schedule 2 Class VII of the Building Regulations 2000 the glazing must be in comply with Approved Document N.
That the addition of a conservatory may contravene Regulation B1 by affecting the means of escape in case of fire from the building if opening windows are required at the first floor level for escape purposes. Please consult a professional advisor if you are unsure.